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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 3:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Uncle Sam Symbol?

Living in an interesting part of the non-Western world as I do, I can't help but notice the odd collection of T-shirts and other items referring to rock bands that are being worn by people who almost certainly have no clue what they mean.

Today on the street, I happened to see two schoolgirls dressed properly in private school uniforms. One had pigtails, ribbons, and a backpack with a printed symbol that appeared to be ... a GD Uncle Sam skull. No mirrored glasses, but it was a grinning skull wearing a top hat with stars and stripes.

I don't know if there are other bands who use a skull with a stars-and-stripes top hat. But I figure someone else here might know.

If not, it may qualify as the first GD reference I've seen on the street here, at least in the popular market. (There is also a shop in Freak Street, the old hippie hangout, that sells embroidered GD t-shirts. But that's for tourists.) It would mean that some Chinese or Indian company has come to the interesting conclusion that the GD Uncle Sam is a cool image to stick on cheap backpacks for the third-world market.

Incidentally, I have so far spotted the following bands or semi-pseudo-musical references on locally worn (e.g., non-tourist) T-shirts or backpacks: Britney Spears, Metallica, Guns n Boring (oops, you know what I mean), the Sex Pistols (finally, some taste!), the Ramones (ditto), Led Zeppelin (but only once), and Bob Marley (whose visage is not only on T-shirts but on some public buses, along with ganja leaf stickers.)

If it was indeed Uncle Sam, I hope it marks a positive trend in third world educational advancement, and that Mr. U.S. Blues will soon come from behind to squash Britney in the logo-knockoff market.

I wish I'd asked the beribboned schoolgirl what she thought the symbol on her backpack signified. I do need to ask that question sometime. Favorite bizarre T-shirt spotted on a man so far: "Warning: I have PMS and I have a gun." I really wanted to ask him what he thought it meant ...

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 7, 2010 6:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Uncle Sam Symbol: He prefers more shows

"I have PMS and I have a gun"

Classic. That is just too much; perhaps it meant "I Prefer More Shows", but in his world, "prefer" is really more of a directive, or command: thus, you better frickin give me all your shows?

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 7:02am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Uncle Sam Symbol: He prefers more shows

Good interpretation. I like it. I bet he'd "prefer" it, too, if someone had the nerve to tell him what the other interpretation of his T-shirt might be.

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Oct 7, 2010 5:57am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Uncle Sam Symbol?

What is the attitude toward marijuana, and drugs in general, where you are? I am assuming there is a schism between the native and non-native peoples?

Just curious,
TOOTMO

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Oct 7, 2010 6:03am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Uncle Sam Symbol?

"What is the attitude toward marijuana, and drugs in general, where you are?"


Photobucket

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Oct 7, 2010 6:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Uncle Sam Symbol?

Uhmm... shouldn't that still be in his scrotum? Or, did SHE have the better lawyer?

TOOTMO

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Oct 7, 2010 9:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Uncle Sam Symbol?

Royal Nepalese Temple Balls:

Purchased: Coffee Shop Stix - May - 2006

Origin: Finest Nepalese hand rubbed hashish

Look: This is the type of hash that legends are made of. The shiny skin oozes with such a high oil content, you’d think it was a Bubble-ator hash! These pieces are gooey and gorgeous. Rolled into tiny thin strips, it bends easily before breaking to show its gorgeous structured interior. As you see, from the photos at right, the gear was prepared in kilo-blocks with the authentic and colourful “stamped” package.

Smell: Once you light it, everyone in the area knows you have some HIGH QUALITY ol’skool hashish. One bloke walked up to me and told me it flashed him back to Nepal in the early 70’s. I explained that it was from Stix which was located right behind the Nieuwmarkt where we were enjoying the sun. He thanked me and was off immediately to score!

Taste: Have a cold bevy ready to accompany a fat joint; I was hit so hard by the peppery-woody flav and the numbness that in the throat that followed! You can really feel the oils nearly “dripping” down... There is nothing on earth like the taste of the finest high-altitude Nepalese hashish.

Effects: "Blows the mind, cools the head" is what the Nepalese "wrapper" says! YES-I. This hashish has you buzzing-floating around! Like a happy stoned-little bee, you feel relaxed yet uplifted. Overall, it makes for a very positive experience, and one with mild visuals that lasts for a considerably long time as compared to some other darks I have encountered in the past.

Overall: When you find a great smoke like this, it makes you smile. With the exception of a few well-known spots, you would be hard-pressed (no pun intended!) to find a better dark hash on the market right now. It is amazing how some coffeeshops always have consistently top-choice menus… Stix never fails to deliver!

http://www.smokersguide.com/sg/index.html

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 7, 2010 6:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Uncle Sam Symbol?

Ganja is a Nepali (or Hindi) word, and it was traditionally viewed pretty much like alcohol in the West: it was legal, commonly handed out to guests, and also had a longstanding religious association. I think it became illegal in the 1980s, or possibly 1970s (not sure on my history), because of the influx of Westerners who somehow came to conclusion that Kathmandu seemed like a good place to hang out. Indefinitely. Often while naked, or at least too "naked" for local tastes. This was quite a bit less acceptable, culturally speaking, than ganja smoking.

Although it's technically illegal, there is a holiday called Shivaratri, in February, where ganja consumption is not only legal but expected. Kind of like turkey at Thanksgiving, I guess. The saddhus (wandering holy men) go in droves to Pashupatinath, the big temple complex, and basically hang out and smoke openly. Other people make it into milkshakes or whatever.

It also grows wild in the villages and is fed to water buffalos -- to increase milk production, I think. (Though again, I'm not sure on that.)

The seeds are also used in cooking, as an ingredient in pickles, so it must not be illegal to buy them.

Of course, drug addiction is an issue in Nepal just like anywhere else; you see street kids openly sniffing glue, which is so sad, and hard drugs are definitely around, with all the usual family and personal tragedies associated with them. I would assume that this has made a difference in how ganja smoking would be viewed these days. But culturally, the context and history is quite different from the West.